Get the right sauce for this dish - Jamaican Hell Fire Scotch Bonnet Pepper Sauce!


Jamaican Pumpkin Soup:
Ital Recipe

by Ras Soloman Jackson, Mokko

Prepare Peas

  • To do this, place dried kidney beans in a pot (you may pre-soak if desired) and bring them to a boil, then turn down to a simmer.

Coconut Water

  • Grate a coconut fine, add water and squeeze the coconut and work it to extract the strong coconut water. Strain out the coconut particles through a strainer, leaving the coconut water. (You can feed the left over coconut to the dogs.) Set the coconut water aside.

Pumpkin and Starch

  • Peel and cut one slice of pumpkin. Use cooking pumpkin or you may substitute squash. Use a small slice for soup, or if you want a thicker stew, use more pumpkin.
  • Peel and cut up sweet yams (Mokko uses three kinds).
  • Peel and cut up irish potatoes.

All Together

  • Drain the peas, add the vegetables, pumpkin and coconut water to the pot and cook the vegetables.
  • Add a small piece of scotch bonnet pepper (a very small piece for small spice and a larger piece if you want your soup hot). You can substitute with a few drops of Jamaican Hell Fire Sauce.
  • Add one dry packet of chicken noodle soup, taste and add salt if needed.
  • At the end of the cooking add thyme and scallions.
  • Pour the soup into calabash bowls, let cool and eat it. Ya mon!

Watch Ital Cooking Video on YouTube

 

 

Home | Newsletter | Travel Tips | Contact Us | Site Map
Terms and Conditions

content © 2009 Worlds Together Travel Network

55 gallon drum with three stones on top with
Mokko's Cooking Pot

Rasta standing in bamboo enclosed area with large wire reel table and 55 gallon drum as cook stove.
Mokko in his Kitchen

 

Calabash bowl filled with ackee and dumplings.
Ackee & Dumplings

Where to Stay

Featured Product

Jamaica has been a melting pot of many cultural influences including the Africans, Spanish, English, Indians, Asians and Arawaks (native inhabitants pre-Columbus). Out of a diverse mix of foods, spices, and cultures has come this wonderful array of tempting dishes as lively as the people of Jamaica themselves.